519.633.5970

Diabetes in Dogs and Cats

Just like us, diabetes is a disease that affects our furry companions and more cases are diagnosed every year. We cannot cure diabetes, but with the proper care and treatments it can be managed and those affected can live long happy lives.

Diabetes Mellitus (DM)

In simple terms, this disease is a deficiency of the hormone insulin in the body. Insulin’s main job is to tell the body to use the glucose (the sugar we get when we digest what we eat) as energy. This deficiency can happen because the body isn’t producing enough insulin (Type 1 diabetes) or because the body isn’t responding to the insulin that is being produced appropriately (Type 2 diabetes). This results in the body thinking it is starving, and the body starts to break down its own energy stores (fat and muscle), causing many problems to occur.

The Main Signs of DM

  • Excessive Eating
  • Urinating more frequently than normal
  • Drinking more water than usual / always thirsty
  • Weight Loss

Diagnosing and Treating

A pet showing the above signs should be seen by a veterinarian. Blood work and urine testing are required to confirm diabetes. Because diabetes can affect different parts of the body, these tests will also look for any other problems/damage to the body that will need to be addressed. With a diet change and insulin therapy, most pets diagnosed can be treated and will live long comfortable lives.

If your pet is showing any of the above signs, or you suspect your pet has a problem, call us to book an appointment today!

Written by Dr. Adam Mahovlich, DVM

Blog

Veterinary Diets vs Store Bought Diets

Exactly why is Vet food so much more money? And why would I spend that when I can get the same food at the grocery store? Am I getting ripped off?! At $60+ a bag, yes, you would think that you might be getting taken to the cleaners on dog or cat food. Let me de-mystify the cost versus quality question.

Read More
See All Articles

Last updated: June 21, 2022.

Dear Clients,

To ensure all of our patients and clients get the best care possible, please let us know if you cannot make the appointment. All no-shows will be recorded and clients with multiple no-shows may be asked for a deposit before making future appointments. We understand that unforeseen circumstances and emergencies arise. A simple phone call before your scheduled appointment is all that is required - 24 hours notice preferred. This will allow us to offer that spot to a pet in need.

NEW PET OWNERS

Have you welcomed a new furry family member to your home? Visit our Must Know New Pet Owner Information page for useful resources and helpful recommendations for new pet owners.

OPERATING HOURS

We are OPEN with the following hours:

- Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday: 8:30 am – 5:30 pm
- Wednesday: 8:30 am - 12:00 pm
- Saturday & Sunday: CLOSED

If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to call us at (519) 633-5970.

- Your dedicated team at Talbot Animal Clinic