Our team continues to be here for you and your cherished pets. We are OPEN and are now able to provide a wide range of services. To learn more about the changes we have implemented in response to COVID-19 and what to expect during your next visit, click here.

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Senior Dog Care

Our senior furry family members play a wonderful role in our lives. They have grown with us and given us years of unconditional love and affection. Just as we do, senior dogs have to deal with changes to their health as they get older and it is our aim to help both you and your pet deal with these changes as they occur. We want your pets to grow old gracefully and be as healthy and pain-free for as long as possible.

When is a dog considered a senior pet?


Smaller breed dogs tend to age at a slower rate than their large and giant breeds counterparts. That being said, the changes that signal the onset of ageing generally begin to occur at around 6-8 years of age. Most veterinarians agree that dogs are considered to be senior or geriatric at 7 years of age.

What are the most common health issues experienced by senior dogs?


Older animals are more at risk for developing diseases such as thyroid disorders, liver problems, kidney problems, high blood pressure, heart disease, dental disease, muscle and/or joint problems such as arthritis, etc. Many of our pets hide the signs of sore or aching joints from us, and the only subtle sign of problems may be decreased activity as shown by a reluctance to play, climb stairs or jump up onto furniture.

How Should I care for my senior dog?


Since many of these age-related problems can be difficult to spot by the average owner until they are advanced, senior pets should visit the veterinarian more often. Annual checkups are considered to be the norm for adult cats and dogs, but once a pet becomes senior, twice-a-year checkups are advisable so that we can look for subtle signs of problems before they become serious. Since dogs and cats age at a much faster rate than humans, visiting the veterinarian every six months would be the equivalent of visiting your doctor for a complete physical examination every 3 or 4 years!

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Last updated: May 29, 2020

Dear Clients,

With recent changes to restrictions on businesses, we are pleased to advise that effective May 19, 2020 some restrictions on veterinary practices have been lifted. Based on these changes, below are some important updates to our operating policies.

1. WE CAN NOW SEE ALL CASES BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

This includes vaccines, wellness exams, blood work, heartworm testing, spays and neuters, dental services, and more!

2. SAFETY MEASURES TO KEEP EVERYONE SAFE

3. OPERATING HOURS

We are OPEN with the following hours:

- Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday: 8:30 am – 5:30 pm
- Wednesday & Saturday: 8:30 am - 12:00 pm
- Sunday: CLOSED

Thank you for your patience and understanding and we look forward to seeing you and your furry family members again!

- Your dedicated team at Talbot Animal Clinic